Choosing a Home Based on Floorplan

If you are following trends, El Paso home buyers are looking for more house and open concept floorplans. While many skeptics are calling the open kitchen concept a fad, it has actually been around for a lot longer than many realize. Many homeowners believe it offers a functional edge to the way they live. For parents, functionality is what makes working full time and raising a family work. However, despite the convenience that the open living space does offer, many people are still discontent with their home’s layout.

The History of the Open Floorplan

Designers created the open floorplan in the early 1990s. Before this, not only were bedrooms closed off, but kitchens, dining rooms, and living rooms were small enclosed rooms. The more rooms a house had, the more it appealed to prospective buyers. However, designers started to realize that a home with an open floorplan had more usable living space than a closed plan of the same square footage. While taking away the compartmentalized feel, the home became more functional. At the same time, the way a family used their home changed.

Bigger Doesn’t Always Mean Better

While the average home size is 1,000 feet larger than in 1973, according to the Census Bureau, larger doesn’t always mean better. Not only have homes gotten bigger, but families have gotten smaller. This means that the average space per person has increased, and has actually doubled.

However, a recent documentary on minimalist lifestyles created by Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus studied heat maps that illustrated the areas that family members actually used in a house. Most families used a fraction of the space they owned while other areas remained untouched. While the documentary indicates that inflated homes are to blame, there may be other reasons for dead space in American homes.

The trends in the housing market are clearly not focused on what a family wants, but rather what a company wants to sell. In a society where consumers desire more, marketers use the same idea when it comes to homes. However, bigger homes and more space can be a deceiving appeal.

The Floorplan Might be the Issue

Statistics show that 44 percent of first-time homebuyers have regrets about their new home. One of the biggest regrets is buying the wrong sized home or the wrong floorplan. After the new owners spend time in the home that looked so attractively staged, homeowners begin to realize that some of their needs were not met. The closed off kitchen, or the master bedroom that is too far from other rooms, or any other number of issues could just be a bad fit. A lot of times, prospective homeowners did not conduct enough research or plan with enough foresight to find the right home. Instead, they might have focused too much on the home’s aesthetic beauty or the location and neighborhood. Many have even admitted that they rushed into the sale.

Common Problems With Floorplans

The following are just a few examples of complaints that home buyers have had with their house concerning floorplan.

  • Kitchen is too small
  • Closed floorpla
  • Unused formal rooms
  • Rooms are too small
  • Not enough bedrooms
  • Master bedroom is far from the other bedrooms
  • Laundry room is inside the garage
  • Guest bedroom that never gets used
  • Not enough storage space

Choosing a New Home

Many new homebuyers could avoid these mistakes by looking for a brand new home or scoping out model homes. Buying a floorplan and being part of the design process can eliminate the problems that homebuyers face after moving into a previously owned home. While the process takes much longer, there is no need for renovations, upgrades, or repairs down the road. Buying a home based on a floorplan or a model home offers options as well as customizable features.

More Value for Each Dollar

The cost of the home is based on the buyer’s needs instead of an existing home when prospective buyers choose to go with a home builder. There is no settling for something that you may never use because other features of the house are alluring. For instance, a family may like the large kitchen that offers a double oven feature. However, they may be less than thrilled that the home doesn’t have enough closet space. When it comes to purchasing a customizable home, whether or not you can make changes to a floorplan, options are far greater. Then money a home buyer spends will go straight to the desired features for the family’s lifestyle. Not only that, oftentimes a home builder will provide a design expert to assist with the tough decisions. A good home builder will also include the home buyer in each step of the process.

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